Toto, we’re not in Phnom Penh anymore

Hello, my name is Caleb Robey, and I am serving as Luke and Sokha’s intern for this Summer. I will be posting my blog updates here!
After about four days of getting oriented to Khmer culture and language in Phnom Penh, I finally arrived with Luke Smith in Angk’jeay Village last Friday! Being in the village comes with a few challenges (e.g. there are substantially fewer English speakers here than in the city), but the perks of the village are plentiful:
  • The people are kind, generous, and always up for a good laugh.
  • It’s incredibly beautiful.
  • There’s none of this…

  • or this…

As soon as we arrived in the village, I had the chance to observe one of the main ministries being done through Luke and Sokha; English classes. By 11:00AM, students had begun to pour onto the grounds around the Smith’s home to hang out with each other and prepare for the noon English lessons. Three days a week, the Smith’s (along with the help of Samuth, the pastoral intern) use the recess hours of public school to host English classes for beginners, intermediate, and advanced speakers. For the next seven weeks, I will be assisting with the teaching of these classes.

As Saturday morning came, we had the chance to talk with the public school principal in hopes that I would be able to do some english instruction there during my stay in the village. Fortunately, he seemed to like the idea… or Luke threatened him; frankly, I didn’t really understand the conversation since it was in Khmer.* Either way, on Tuesdays and Saturdays (yeah, they have school on Saturdays here… so quit complaining) I will be teaching 4th, 5th, and 6th grade english classes.

After our conversation with the principal, it was almost time to start guitar classes. Another large part of the Smith’s ministry to the village is teaching guitar classes to members of the church. Since Sokha is still in recovery with baby Asa, I will be teaching all of these classes (with plenty of pro-tips from her). Similar to the english classes, they are tiered into three groups based on skill level, and we are hoping to make them bi-weekly for my time here.

To my great pleasure, Saturday ended as most other days end here; playing sports. The students in the village love sports. They play soccer, basketball, and some others, but most of all, they enjoy volleyball. Not what you were expecting? To be perfectly honest, I was a bit surprised as well, especially when I was getting humiliated by students who are substantially smaller than me. You know what they say; it’s all fun and games until you’re getting spiked on by someone who’s six inches shorter than you.

Sunday was a huge encouragement as students that I had met earlier (along with some adults) came to church to teach Sunday School, play music, and participate in worship. Many of them live in homes that do not believe in Jesus Christ, but nonetheless they are committed to the church and its work here in Cambodia.

Already through all of these things, it has been such a privilege to interact with these young men and women. There is still much more to tell you about, but I’ll have to leave it there for now. Please be praying for the gospel to be even more clearly seen and heard in Angk’jeay.

In Christ,

Caleb

*For the record, Luke just confirmed with me that he did not, in fact, threaten the principal of the local public school.

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